40% off “Synth Bundle” by Rhythmic Robot

40% off “Synth Bundle” by Rhythmic Robot

“Synth Bundle” takes 3 classic keyboards from bygone eras (the 50’s, 70’s and 80’s), faithfully recreates them in software, then injects them with all manner of weird and wonderful modern day digital synth goodness… with the end result being that their capabilities go far beyond what the original hardware units were ever capable of!

You can use these instruments to recreate classic synth patches, or make new, unique, warped instruments whose sonic palette references a bygone age. They are a great way to weave your own sonic textures from classic synth source material!

Deal Expired

3 Classic Synths As You’ve Never Heard Them Before!

“Synth Bundle” features 3 classic synths from the 50’s, 70’s and 80’s that have been lovingly recreated… and then taken far beyond what their original creators could have ever imagined!

This bundle includes the following libraries:

If you crave the classic sounds of these iconic keyboards from the past but still want all the tweak-ability of a modern synth then this bundle could be just what you’ve been waiting for!

The deal ends in:

EII Synthulator

The Emulator II is a glorious slice of musical history, and Rhythmic Robot thoroughly enjoyed the process of turning it into an archival Kontakt instrument in the Emulator II Universe of Sounds libraries. But even before they embarked on that mammoth sampling session, a thought was stirring at the back of their minds. Wouldn’t it be cool if the Emulator hadn’t just been a sampler? Wouldn’t it be cool if it had been more of a synth as well?

Of course, the Emulator II did have some synthesiser-type capabilities: that awesome analogue filter, to name just one. But the dots didn’t really join up into something that you could use to create sounds from scratch. Enter the Synthulator, which is at its heart a very simple idea indeed: use the Emulator II as the basis of a sample-and-synth creation in the mould of the Roland D50.

Synthulator takes as its starting point a series of custom soundbanks, including all the core analogue waveforms (saw, sine, square, pulse, triangle etc). These were sampled into an EII and then back out again, to stamp them with all that wonderful 8-bit sonic impurity.

There are also sustaining sounds taken from more complex instrument sources, so there are complex synth waves sourced from analogue and digital gear; and also things like the sustain portions of string and brass sounds.

Two separate oscillators are given over to these sustaining waves, and the two can be mixed freely and have the rather cool X-Mod applied to them (X-Mod being, basically, a slow LFO that blends between the two waves, allowing for radical periodic shifts in tonality).

There’s also a separate Attack oscillator, which draws on its own collection of short attack samples – everything from piano strikes through saxophone blurts to flutey chiffs.

Rhythmic Robot have included both typical synth control features (like a filter) and some pretty comprehensive dynamics control, so that Synthulator is a really expressive instrument to play. You can use Velocity to cross-fade between Sustain waves, or to open the filter; lay into your keyboard and the whole tonality of the sound can change or open up.

Also at your disposal are some excellent effects: the icing on the cake here is the inclusion of the same nine convolved Lexicon Reverbs Rhythmic Robot used on the EII libraries, which bring period-authentic rich, digital reverb spaces to the sounds.

They also paid a lot of attention to the Glitch button, tweaking its parameters so that it hits the sweet spot even more frequently. Click on this and you get a ‘musically randomised’ new patch. Instant gratification!

Synthulator also ships with over 90 factory patches, many of which were created by Synthmeister Anatol Locker and which are really rather awesome.

Synthulator is a unique resource for creating original sounds which sound like they’re coming straight from a big blue EII. With a sound palette that spans acoustic and synthesised sounds, all imbued with grit and weight thanks to the EII’s wonderful convertors, it’s a great way to weave your own sonic textures from classic source material. The 80s have never sounded so good!

Jennings MK 2

This is what happens when you take 1950s valve-driven technology – courtesy of the amazing Jennings Univox valve synthesiser – and pump it with so many tachyons that it warps through its own wormhole into an alternate future.

Well, not really. But that’s kind of what Rhythmic Robot were thinking when they started Jennings Mk 2″: what would a massive analogue polysynth – the kind Roland were building in the 80s, say – sound like if the only technology available was 1950s valves? A multi-oscillator monster with all kinds of LFOs and modulation and so on, but with a valve heart? Well, no such thing exists, of course; so they built it. And it turns out it sounds pretty damn swell…

Jennings Mk 2 reinvents our original Jennings Univox. With the original Rhythmic Robot aimed at a painstaking recreation of the machine the Beatles used in The Cavern down to the smallest details, but the Mk 2 version abandons historical accuracy and instead takes the concept of a valve synth far further.

Instead of one detuneable oscillator, you get three (and a sub); instead of one set of waveshaping tabs, you get two, which can be operated in parallel. The first two oscillators give you that unique and evocative 50s valve tone, while the third broadens your sonic palette hugely by roping in classic analogue waveforms including sine and noise waves.

On the Osc 3 Effects pane you can add chorus, phasing, echo and rotary speaker to the third oscillator while leaving the blended valve tones shining through; or you can use the modelled amp cab to get a more Jenningsy tone into the third oscillator, blending it and creating a more vintage tonality. Further fun comes courtesy of the Jennings valve-based sub-oscillator, which tracks the envelope and pitch of Osc 1 but an octave lower.

And finally there’s the classic Jennings “Perc” setting, which can be dialled in to add some key-click to key or bass patches. Four oscillators plus key-click… if you want rich, complex, mobile waveforms, this thing delivers.

A typical big polysynth might, if you’re lucky, give you two filters to play with; so Rhythmic Robot went with four. One switchable high / low pass for each individual oscillator, to sculpt the basic waves; and one Global filter switchable again between high and low pass.

There are LFOs scattered all over the synth, perfect for creating movement, and they can all be cranked up into the audio range for serious weirdness if you want to go that far. The Osc 1 and 2 LFOs and the Global Filter LFO have switchable shapes, so you can get special effects and pulses going using the ramp or square; or randomised effects with the smoothed sample-and-hold. Osc 3’s LFOs are sine-based, but there are two of them, controlling pitch and amplitude for separate tremolo and vibrato.

If you want to go for all-out unpredictability, there is of course Rhythmic Robot’s world-famous Glitch control which short-circuits the Jennings and yields up randomised, unique patch settings every time you click it. These are “musically” randomised, so you don’t get atonal mush every time. Try it and see, and if you don’t like the sound, try it again!

The original Jennings brought the forgotten sound of a lost synth era back to light. Jennings Mk 2 takes that sound and lets it off the leash for sonic exploration far in advance of the original hardware. You can use it to recreate classic synth patches which will come out with a totally different, valve-based flavour; to cook up strange, vintage tonalities that feel both unknown and familiar at the same time; and to make new, unique, warped instruments whose sonic palette references a bygone age. This is a strange, magical machine.

The deal ends in:

Poly 770

The Korg 770 is a wonderful little synth – quirky, imaginative, oddball, strange in all the right ways. Fundamentally it’s a twin-oscillator monosynth with the usual waveforms and a fairly standard control set (although there’s a ring modulator, which is a little unexpected and very welcome)… except for three significant differences that really set it apart from the crowd.

First, the “Traveler”. This is Korg’s name for the filter, and it comprises of a cool arrangement of high-pass and low-pass circuits which are ganged together so you can either use them independently or as a band-pass. They’re linked to some very leftfield contour generators. Sometimes what comes out isn’t what you were expecting, but overall, it’s great.

Second, there’s the Scale Noise option, which is – basically – noise with a pitched component. You have no idea until you’ve used it how useful it is musically. It elevates noise from something that you can use only on part of a sound (the attack “chiff” of a flute, say) to something that’s musical in its own right… without eating up an oscillator. Absolutely fantastic.

Thirdly, there’s the Chorus wave, which is a detuned sawtooth; again, here you get instant warmth without even accessing Osc 2, which is a godsend.

All in all, the 770 is just a ton of fun in a tiny little package, and Rhythmic Robot think the world of theirs, especially the sound (which is kind of grainy and airy and quite unlike a lot of other synths). So the big question was: how to set it free in software?

Well Rhythmic Robot managed it… as well as sampling and recreating the Korg’s oscillators, they convolution sampled its weird and wonderful Traveler circuit, so you can hear exactly what that oddball cluster of components does to the sound. They recreated the PWM in software so you can get evolving, developing textures out of it. And then they went a lot further.

The hardware 770 has an External Input, which is great for running other synths in tandem through the Korg’s signal path, so they thought – why not do that here, too?

Rhythmic Robot built in an External section which gives you access to 25 multisampled sounds from outside the 770: things like Lambda strings and brass, PolySix pads and chorused sweeps, even a second subtly detuned 770 programmed with particularly useful sounds designed to blend with your basic waves.

Scale Noise is there for you to play around with (along with White and Pink noise), plus they’ve included a Sub Oscillator for depth and retrofitted sine waves to the main oscillators, just in case you need them.

There’s a modern, sweepable low-pass Filter with full ADSR; twin high-pass filters for sculpting both the whole sound and just the External input; and Rhythmic Robot’s signature Glitch control is right there on the front panel, so you can just smack away at that until you’re rewarded with a patch you like.

So this is by no means a slavish recreation of the original little monosynth; instead, it is a great big breathing, humming, crackling beast of a polysynth, capable of strange radiophonic madness one moment and blissful chillout soundscapes the next. We think you’re going to like it!

So What Exactly Can I Do With “Synth Bundle”?

With “Synth Bundle” Rhythmic Robot set out to take three iconic keyboard instruments and supercharge them with modern digital synth abilities.

The result is a trio of unique libraries that let you make new, unique, warped instruments whose sonic palette references a bygone age, and they are perfect for the following styles of music:

  • Pop
  • Rock
  • Funk
  • Electronica
  • Underscore

Note: Requires the FULL retail version of Kontakt 4.2.3 or higher (NOT compatible with the free Kontakt Player)

"Synth Bundle" by Rhythmic Robot

40% off "Synth Bundle" by Rhythmic Robot

Deal Expired

Normally €75 – get it at 40% off before it’s gone!

  • 40% off the normal price (normally €75)!
  • 3 Classic Synths As You’ve Never Heard Them Before!
  • EII Synthulator
  • Massive Emulator II-derived sample-and-synthesis machine in the style of the Roland D50!
  • Over 90 factory patches included: 1.32Gb of authentic EII samples!
  • Emulator grit and heft; synthesiser scope and scale
  • X-Mod and comprehensive performance control allow for dynamic, expressive, shifting timbres
  • Graft sampled Attack waves to synthesised (or sampled!) Sustain waves for complex, rewarding patches… or use the Glitch control for instant new sounds
  • Jennings Mk 2
  • 4-osc synth architecture with a twist!
  • Two valve-based oscillators offering shapeable waveforms; one valve suboscillator; one classic analogue oscillator
  • Multiple modulation possibilities; massive filter bank
  • Poly 770
  • A Radiophonic Workshop-style synthesist’s delight, fusing a fully polyphonic Korg 770 to a selection of sophisticated controls!
  • ‘External Input’ module brings complex waves from other Korg machines into the signal path: dial up the sounds of the Lambda, PolySix and more!
  • Faithfully-modelled vintage Traveler circuit for eerie, resonant band-pass filtering
  • ‘Virtual PWM’, five separate filters, Scale noise, three oscillators + sub
  • 40 factory patches and the ever-popular Glitch control to make rolling your own as easy as clicking a button!
  • Note:Requires the FULL retail version of Kontakt 4.2.3 or higher (NOT compatible with the free Kontakt Player)
  • Perfect for Pop, Rock, Funk, Electronica and Underscore!

What People Think About 40% off “Synth Bundle” by Rhythmic Robot

  • "Rhythmic Robot Synthulator is the real deal. Rarely does one find a virtual instrument so inspiring. The grit of a vintage sampler and the flexibility of Kontakt implementation combine to provide a singular sonic experience for the performer and the listener. Don’t miss out on this."

    Full Review

    Michael (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "Lovely idea – taking the sampled sounds of the legendary Emulator II and bringing a full synth engine to bear on them. The possibilities are probably endless – I haven’t had the time yet to explore fully. Glitch makes it easy to find starting points for new sounds and the effects are the usual excellent array from RR. I will be using this synth for a long time to come."

    Full Review

    James (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "Jennings sounds like nothing else we’ve encountered… it excels at exceptional string and organ sounds. Producers looking for unique valve synthesiser sounds from a long-gone era should love it… In a market full of generic-sounding soft synths, Jennings recreates a unique flavour from a bygone era"

    Full Review

    Future Music Magazine / Music Radar

    Future Music Magazine / Music Radar

    Music Industry Blog

  • "If you need a synth that has actual grit & funk, look no further. [Poly 770] is a bad mofo for that sizzle that you need. The scale noise is perfect for making pads or FX. Having a sub oscillator is a godsend on a synth that concentrates so much on the middle frequencies as well. A great lil synth for filling in that sonic space that you need if you don’t have it….pitched warm noise! Another plus to the team at RR!"

    Full Review

    Saukar (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "Poly 770 - There’s something weird and wonderful about this one! Not a Minimoog not an Oberheim SEM, something in between! Excellent emulation by the Rhytmic Robot guys. Especially the additional waveform is such a cool feature since you can add lots of energy by stacking and overloading things!"

    Full Review

    Elmar (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "As I suspected it would be, Synthulator is a gem. There are so many sounds in here that seem to come from somewhere deep in the caverns of the unconscious. Of course, growing up in the 1980s probably helps. But so much of this sound is woven into our cyclic sonic worldview now that I suspect this feeling is universal. Synthulator includes the coveted glitch/rnd button, which allows for some truly haunting and unexpected sounds. An indispensable tool for the kit, at this price."

    Full Review

    Aqaraza (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "Poly 770 - I’m blown away by the unique sound of this synth. Instant inspiration. I think I’ve purchased about 20 instruments from these RR in the last month. Tons of truly addictive, superb instruments."

    Full Review

    Clint (Verified Owner)

    User Review

  • "I LOVE anything that is retro and smells like my Grandma’s house, so I was intrigued with this piece of software, and whether the company were able to create a truly ‘vintage’ sound that is warm and slightly ‘dirty’. I found the Jennings instrument very easy to use, with a great initial set of patches. Each preset was crafted with care and attention, and there is plenty of sounds that will work well in a range of genres, including retro 50s and 60s style music, all varieties of electronic music, and horror / thriller music."

    Full Review

    Film & Game Composers

    Film & Game Composers

    Music Industry Blog

  • "It’s a triumph of virtualisation… Jennings has been beautifully realised and sounds gorgeous – weird, warm and characterful"

    Full Review

    Computer Music Magazine

    Computer Music Magazine

    Music Industry Blog

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